Future Volumes

Future volumes that have been commissioned by the series include:

  • Jeremy du Quesnay Adams (Southern Methodist University): Spanish Orthodoxy in Council (400-702), a volume of selected Hispano-Roman and Visigothic councils (texts and translations);
  • David Albertson (University of Southern California) and K. Meredith Ziebart (Loyola University Maryland): The Tegernsee Debate on Love and Knowledge: Letters and Treatises on Mystical Theology from the 1450s, a collection of letters and treatises that circulated among Bernard of Waging, Vincent of Aggsbach, Johann Schlitpacher, Marquard Sprenger, Conrad Geisenfeld, and Nicholas of Cusa between 1451 and 1464 on the subject of the nature of mystical theology (texts and translations);
  • Rachel Fulton Brown (University of Chicago): John of Garland, Epithalamium beate Marie virginis (revised edition and English translation);
  • Charles S. F. Burnett (Warburg Institute): the "Tegernsee Miscellany," a collection of texts on cosmology and anthropology (edition and translation);
  • Marco Conti (Loyola University Chicago, The John Felice Rome Center): Hugeburc of Heidenheim, Vita Willibaldi and Vita Wynnebaldi (edition and translation);
  • Marco Conti (Loyola University Chicago, The John Felice Rome Center): Nithard, Historiae (edition and translation);
  • Eugene J. Crook (Florida State University) and Margaret Jennings (St. Joseph's College, Brooklyn): Ranulph Higden, Speculum curatorum, Books II and III (new edition and translation continuing the project begun with Book I = DMTT 13.1);
  • Nirmal Dass (Toronto): Encomium Emmae reginae (new edition and translation);
  • Michael Dunne (National University of Ireland, Maynooth), Peter of Ireland, Expositio et quaestiones in Aristotelis librum De longitudine et brevitate vitae (reprint of the author's own edition, with translation and new introduction);
  • Lee Michael Fratantuono (Ohio Wesleyan University) and Stephen Maddux (University of Dallas): The Sermons of Peter Lombard (edition and translation);
  • June-Ann Greeley (Sacred Heart University): Theodulf of Orléans, Complete Poetry and Prose (new edition and translation);
  • Jeremiah Hackett (University of South Carolina): Roger Bacon, Communia naturalium, Book I, Part IV (new edition and translation);
  • L. Michael Harrington (Duquesne University): The Divine Names (continuation of the edition and translation of the thirteenth-century Parisian textbook on mystical theology begun in vols. 4 and 12);
  • Franklin T. Harkins (Durham University): Filia Magistri, a thirteenth-century abridgment of Peter Lombard's Book of Sentences (edition and translation);
  • Holly Johnson (Mississippi State University): The Sermons of Robert Rypon (2 volumes, new edition and translation);
  • Junius Johnson (Yale University): Bonaventure, Sentences Commentary, Book IV, dist. 8–13 on the Eucharist (Latin text from the 1889 Quaracchi edition with English translation);
  • Catherine Kavanagh (Mary Immaculate College, Limerick): Robert Grosseteste, Expositio in epistolam Sancti Pauli ad Galatas (reprint of the Corpus Christianorum text with English translation);
  • Jaime Leaños (University of Nevada at Reno), Aeneas Silvio Piccolomini, Epistula ad Mahomatem II (new edition and translation);
  • Constant J. Mews (Monash University, Melbourne): a collection of fifty-five hitherto unknown letters by Hugh Metel, a correspondent of Abelard and Heloise (edition and translation);
  • Abram Ring (Franklin & Marshall College): Waltharius (new edition and translation);
  • Aage Rydstrøm-Poulsen (University of Greenland): Richard of Saint Victor, De Trinitate (reprint of the edition by Jean Ribaillier and translation);
  • Edward M. Schoolman (University of Nevada, Reno) and Sarah L. Whitten (University of California, Los Angeles): The Chronicles of Early Medieval Southern Italy (edition and translation of three chronicles);
  • Jonathan Wilson (University of Liverpool), Gosuini de expugnatione Salaciae carmen and De expugnatione Scalabis (edition and translation).

Several of these volumes are close to completion.